The ’Florence Principles’ on the Doctorate in the Arts – publication available

ELIA’s publication endorsed and supported by Cumulus

This paper is intended as a position paper on the doctorate in the arts. It is formulated as a point of reference for policymakers, university leaders, curriculum designers and research funding agencies.

Presented at the ELIA Biennial Conference in Florence on 2 December 2016.

THE ‘FLORENCE PRINCIPLES’
ON THE DOCTORATE IN THE ARTS

A publication by
European League of the Institutes of the Arts (ELIA)

Endorsed and supported by
AEC – Association Européenne des Conservatoires, Académies de Musique et Musikhochschulen
CILECT- International Association of Film and Television Schools (Centre International de Liaison des Ecoles de Cinéma et de Télévision)
Cumulus – International Association of Universities and Colleges of Art, Design and Media
SAR – Society for Artistic Research

This paper is intended as a position paper on the doctorate in the arts. It is formulated as a point of reference for policymakers, university leaders, curriculum designers and research funding agencies. It is addressed to universities of art and science alike, helping the former to secure recognition for their endeavours (with national funding bodies, legislature, etc.) and helping the latter to learn about the research developments within the art university sector.

Over the past four decades, the doctorate in the arts has been established to varying degrees and in various forms throughout the EU and beyond. It is evident that a global debate has been taking place, and the development of common standards for art-based PhDs have begun to emerge. A number of shared topics has been identified and become the subject of national and European discussion within the artistic research community and arts universities and one central commonality has been found within the artistic research community: a doctorate in the arts complies with the prerequisites for a PhD, as formulated in the sciences and humanities and as described, for example, by European position papers such as the Salzburg Recommendations (EUA) or the Principles of Innovative Doctoral Training (EU Commission).

International debates within doctorates in the arts can be grouped around two poles. On the one hand, discussion has centred on practical, institutional questions concerning doctoral degree regulations (e.g. admission, examination, requirements of the PhD project, taught courses and the extent to which this should be mandatory) and the financing of PhD candidates (employment, grants). On the other hand, questions have been identified about what is at stake in relation to a series of strategic areas including6:
– The Bologna Declaration,
– The formats for presenting PhD outcomes and the significance of the discursive within this.
– The discussion of best practices and role models, without fixing a normative canon or becoming bogged down in loose descriptions of criteria.
– The role, quality and training of doctoral supervisors8.
– The organisation and structure of doctoral programmes in the arts (e.g. mixed graduate schools, research groups, individual PhDs)

This paper has been developed by the Artistic Research Working Group established by the European League of the Institutes of the Arts (ELIA), which includes also delegates of both the Society for Artistic Research (SAR) and the Association Européenne des Conservatoires, Académies de Musique et Musikhochschulen (AEC).

To read the Florence Principles please follow the link
http://artistic-research.no/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/The-florence-principles-on-the-doctorate-in-the-arts.pdf

Source: http://www.elia-artschools.org/

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